Where Have All the Bees Gone?: Pollinators in Crisis

By: Rebecca E. Hirsch

Bumblebees—the teddy bears of the bee world—are in trouble. There are roughly 250 species of bumblebees all in the genus Bombus worldwide. In North America alone, four once-common Bombus species have vanished from their former ranges. And that poses problems for everyone: Bumblebees are the main pollinators for many of our food products, including blueberries, tomatoes, apples, and almonds. Author Rebecca E. Hirsch chronicles the evolution and the history of bees, examines the role of wild bees in food production and natural habitats, and digs into the serious threats they are facing—dwindling habitat, deadly pesticides, the spread of disease, and climate change. She also calls on young readers to act, outlining specific steps they can take to study, understand, and protect bumblebees.

Author’s note. Glossary. Source notes. Selected bibliography. Further information. Index. Full-color photographs, charts, and diagrams.

ISBN: 9781541534636

JLG Release: Apr 2020


Sensitive Areas: None
Topics: Bees , Conservation , Bee extinction , Insect pollinators , Pollination by bees

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Though all the bees haven’t gone anywhere, and, as the author notes, even the colony collapse disorder that threatened to wipe out the commercial honeybee industry a few years ago has abated, Hirsch reports that researchers have discovered major declines in the numbers of certain North American bee species. The cause is hard to pin down, but the Though all the bees haven’t gone anywhere, and, as the author notes, even the colony collapse disorder that threatened to wipe out the commercial honeybee industry a few years ago has abated, Hirsch reports that researchers have discovered major declines in the numbers of certain North American bee species. The cause is hard to pin down, but the author points to improper use of neonicotinoid insecticides, habitat destruction, and evidence that commercially raised bees are spreading virulent forms of infections, diseases, and other parasites to their indigenous relatives. Why does it matter? “Without bees, we wouldn’t have food.” What’s to be done? Hirsch suggests that curious readers dig into her generous selection of print and online resources to raise awareness, plant a flower garden, and perhaps leave dried perennial stalks out for solitary bees to winter in. Still, along with clearer understandings of bee evolution and life cycles, and how pollination works, readers will come away concerned. Frequent sidebars, plus a mix of diagrams, flower pictures, and close-up photos of a variety of different types of bees, enhance the presentation. An informative survey for students of biology and environmental science and just a tick denser in language and content than Emily Morgan’s Next Time You See a Bee.

Book Details

ISBN

9781541534636

First Release

April 2020

Genre

Nonfic

Dewey Classification

595.79

Trim Size

6 1/4" x 9 1/4"

Page Count

104

Accelerated Reader

N/A

Scholastic Reading Counts

N/A

Lexile

Level 1060L

Format

Print Book

Edition

Library edition

Publisher

Twenty-First Century Books

Potentially Sensitive Areas

None

Topics

Bees, Conservation, Bee extinction, Insect pollinators, Pollination by bees,

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