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Race through the Skies: The Week the World Learned to Fly

By: Martin W. Sandler

In 1903, the Wright brothers made three brief flights, and no one was there to watch them. Six years later, Wilbur Wright traveled to Europe to evangelicize about aviation and raise money for patents--and the world got aviation fever. That summer, a group of champagne companies organized the first ever international air meet. They knew they could throw a great party and sell a lot of champagne. They didn’t know that this single week would change the course of aviation history.

Through remarkable photographs, firsthand accounts, and lively narrative, Marty Sandler tells the story of this first international air meet, marking the public introduction of flight.

“Postscript: What Happened to the Heroes of Rheims?.” “For 
Reading, Surfing, and Visiting.” Sources. Index. Full-color 
photographs.

ISBN: 9781547603442

JLG Release: Sep 2020


Sensitive Areas: None
Topics: Orville Wright (1871-1948) , Wilbur Wright (1867-1912) , History of aeronautics , Airplanes , Races , Competitions , Aviation , Flight

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School Library Journal

Sandler’s historical overview of aviation focuses on a weeklong air show in the fall of 1908 in Reims, France. The events featured thrilling contests for speed and distance and hosted many of the prominent aviators and aircraft builders of the day, including fierce competition between the American flight pioneer Glenn Curtiss and Frenchman Louis Sandler’s historical overview of aviation focuses on a weeklong air show in the fall of 1908 in Reims, France. The events featured thrilling contests for speed and distance and hosted many of the prominent aviators and aircraft builders of the day, including fierce competition between the American flight pioneer Glenn Curtiss and Frenchman Louis Blériot, the first person to fly across the English Channel. A common theme throughout is the extreme risk for early pilots, such as Peruvian aviator Jorge Chávez, the first person to fly across the Alps, who crashed on descent and died from his injuries. Numerous supplemental texts highlight tangential topics (the design differences between biplanes and single-wing aircraft, the evolution of dirigibles during the same time, and “Women in the Air,” spotlighting pilots such as Bessie Coleman, the first Black and Native American woman to earn her pilot’s license). Copious period photos are integrated cleanly with the text and design. Additional illustrations include newspaper pages and promotional posters. Back matter contains a list of related books, websites, and places to visit, such as the Glenn H. Curtiss Museum in Hammondsport, NY. No source notes are included, but a bibliography and an annotated list of significant sources are included. The topic doesn’t fall easily into categories and might require hand selling, but this captivating nonfiction read will appeal to anyone interested in the history of flight, inventions, or thrill sports.

Book Details

ISBN

9781547603442

First Release

September 2020

Genre

Nonfic

Dewey Classification

629.1309

Trim Size

8 3/4" x 11"

Page Count

192

Accelerated Reader

N/A

Scholastic Reading Counts

N/A

Lexile

N/A

Format

Print Book

Edition

Hardcover edition

Publisher

Bloomsbury USA

Potentially Sensitive Areas

None

Topics

Orville Wright (1871-1948), Wilbur Wright (1867-1912), History of aeronautics, Airplanes, Races, Competitions, Aviation, Flight,

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