Chat with us, powered by LiveChat

The Poison Eaters: Fighting Danger and Fraud in Our Food and Drugs

By: Gail Jarrow

Formaldehyde, borax, salicylic acid. Today, these chemicals are used in embalming fluids, cleaning supplies, and acne medications. But in 1900, they were routinely added to food that Americans ate from cans and jars. Often products weren’t safe because unregulated, unethical companies added these and other chemicals to trick consumers into buying spoiled food or harmful medicines. Chemist Harvey Washington Wiley recognized these dangers and began a relentless thirty-year campaign to ensure that consumers could purchase safe food and drugs, eventually leading to the creation of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or FDA.

Acclaimed nonfiction and Sibert Honor-winning author Gail Jarrow uncovers this intriguing history in her trademark style that makes the past enthrallingly relevant for today’s young readers.

ISBN: 9781629794389

JLG Release: Dec 2019


Sensitive Areas: Drugs/Alcohol/Tobacco: Drug Use/Abuse, Illustrations/Images: Disturbing Imagery, Drugs/Alcohol/Tobacco: Alcohol Abuse
Topics: Harvey Washington Wiley (1844–1930) , Food science , Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906 , US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) , Advertising , Journalists , American history

$13.50  Member Price


Add to Wishlist

Like this book? Get more like it every month.

Nonfiction Middle

Grades 5-8

12 titles/year

$214.20/year

Awards & Honors

2020 Orbis Pictus Award Honor
Kirkus Best Books - 2019
Bulletin Blue Ribbons - 2019
CPL Best Books - 2019
The Nonfiction Detectives Best Nonfiction Books - 2019

Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Kirkus Reviews*, Booklist*, Publishers Weekly*, School Library Journal, The Horn Book Magazine

School Library Journal

Candy made with arsenic, babies soothed by morphine, and milk preserved with formaldehyde. After hooking readers with these gut-wrenching accounts, Jarrow focuses on Harvey Wiley, whose tireless efforts during the early 20th century heavily contributed to the first food and drug regulations in the United States. His food additive experiments on 12 Candy made with arsenic, babies soothed by morphine, and milk preserved with formaldehyde. After hooking readers with these gut-wrenching accounts, Jarrow focuses on Harvey Wiley, whose tireless efforts during the early 20th century heavily contributed to the first food and drug regulations in the United States. His food additive experiments on 12 men nicknamed the Poison Squad rose to national attention. While people were learning of the dangers they were ingesting, the government resisted regulations that would hurt its relationship with big business. But after Upton Sinclair’s novel The Jungle was published, the government was swayed and the Food and Drugs Act of 1906 was born. The book recounts Wiley’s attempts to effect change through his government work and as a writer for Good Housekeeping, up until the end of his life. Jarrow then briefly discusses current food regulation. Examples of contaminated foods and toxic medications will awe readers, and photos and graphics depict the horrors. With detailed descriptions of revolting food-production standards and dangerously uncontrolled medications, Jarrow captivates readers with a history of food and drug regulation. Recommended for nonfiction readers and anyone interested in what they are eating.

Horn Book

Formaldehyde in milk, cocaine in toothache drops, sausage made from pulverized meat scraps swept off factory floors along with rat feces. “At the dawn of the twentieth century, few people had a clue that they were regularly being ripped off, drugged, and poisoned.” More and more Americans were living in towns and cities, and, instead of produci Formaldehyde in milk, cocaine in toothache drops, sausage made from pulverized meat scraps swept off factory floors along with rat feces. “At the dawn of the twentieth century, few people had a clue that they were regularly being ripped off, drugged, and poisoned.” More and more Americans were living in towns and cities, and, instead of producing their own fruits, vegetables, and meats, they bought food from stores. They didn’t know who made the food they were consuming, and there was little regulation of the food industry. Jarrow (Spooked!, rev. 9/18; Bubonic Plague, rev. 3/16) traces the story of Dr. Harvey Washington Wiley, now known as the “Father of the FDA,” who devoted his life to getting the federal government to take responsibility for protecting consumers from poisonous foods. No longer would radium be used to paint watch faces, or deadly nightshade in baby teething tablets. It’s a fascinating horror story and an important study of real-life heroes who stood up and fought for government intervention on behalf of the American people. The book’s open layout and plentiful archival photographs, advertisements, and other visuals enhance accessibility and interest. Thorough back matter includes a (necessary) glossary, meticulous source notes, a lengthy bibliography, an index, and a “More to Explore” guide.

Book Details

ISBN

9781629794389

First Release

December 2019

Genre

Nonfic

Dewey Classification

344.7304

Trim Size

10" x 8"

Page Count

176

Accelerated Reader

N/A

Scholastic Reading Counts

N/A

Lexile

Level 1020L

Format

Print Book

Edition

Hardcover edition

Publisher

Calkins Creek

Potentially Sensitive Areas

Drugs/Alcohol/Tobacco: Drug Use/Abuse, Illustrations/Images: Disturbing Imagery, Drugs/Alcohol/Tobacco: Alcohol Abuse

Topics

Harvey Washington Wiley (1844–1930), Food science, Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906, US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Advertising, Journalists, American history,

Standard MARC Record

Download Standard MARC Record

Cover Art

Download Cover Art

Recommended Titles From Nonfiction Middle

Nonfiction Middle

$17.85

On the Horizon

by Lois Lowry

Nonfiction Middle

$17.85

Nonfiction Middle

$17.85

Nonfiction Middle

$17.85
Copyright © 2017 Magento, Inc. All rights reserved.