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Chandra’s Magic Light: A Story in Nepal



by
Theresa Heine
illustrated by
Judith Gueyfier

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Barefoot Books
Imprint
Barefoot
ISBN
9781846864933
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$12.00   $5.00
SEE MEMBER PRICE
QTY
Out of stock

JLG Category

Easy Reading Plus

When sisters Chandra and Deena see solar tukis for sale in their Nepalese village, they start earning money, determined to replace their family’s noxious kerosene lamp. Information about Nepal. Directions to make a pizza-box solar oven. Full-color illustrations were created with acrylic paint, color pencils, and collage.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

40

Dewey

Fic

AR

3.4: points 0.5

Lexile

AD620L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

0

JLG Release

Sep 2014

Book Genres


Topics

Lamps. Solar energy. Moneymaking projects. Sisters. Nepal. Helping family.

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Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Booklist, The Horn Book Guide, Kirkus Reviews, Publishers Weekly, School Library Journal

School Library Journal

While shopping in the marketplace, Chandra and her sister, Deena, watch a man selling solar lights. Because few have electricity, at home, Nepali families use tukis, or kerosene lamps, that are very smoky and produce unhealthy fumes. Although the solar lamp is expensive, the girls are certain that it would help quiet their baby brother’s smoke-induced cough. They excitedly share the information about the “magic light” with their father. However, it isn’t until he sees one working at a neighbor’s house that he becomes interested. The new lamps cost more than the family has available, so the girls brainstorm ways they can earn the money. They decide to sell bunches of colorful rhododendrons that grow in the hills. Arriving early to market, Deena has time to tell Chandra a story of the sun god, Surya, and the moon god, Chandra. The young girl is proud to be named for such a powerful god. The girls’ stall does well, and they are able to purchase the last solar light available. That night, their little brother sleeps and breathes peacefully. The full-color, mixed-media illustrations dominate the pages with vitality and detail. Thorough endnotes provide much information about Nepal, its people and solar power as well as instructions for making a solar oven. This tale of sibling compassion and ingenuity provides enough story for enjoyment alone but would also work well as an introduction to another culture and religion.—Sara-Jo Lupo Sites, George F. Johnson Memorial Library, Endicott, NY

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

While shopping in the marketplace, Chandra and her sister, Deena, watch a man selling solar lights. Because few have electricity, at home, Nepali families use tukis, or kerosene lamps, that are very smoky and produce unhealthy fumes. Although the solar lamp is expensive, the girls are certain that it would help quiet their baby brother’s smoke-induced cough. They excitedly share the information about the “magic light” with their father. However, it isn’t until he sees one working at a neighbor’s house that he becomes interested. The new lamps cost more than the family has available, so the girls brainstorm ways they can earn the money. They decide to sell bunches of colorful rhododendrons that grow in the hills. Arriving early to market, Deena has time to tell Chandra a story of the sun god, Surya, and the moon god, Chandra. The young girl is proud to be named for such a powerful god. The girls’ stall does well, and they are able to purchase the last solar light available. That night, their little brother sleeps and breathes peacefully. The full-color, mixed-media illustrations dominate the pages with vitality and detail. Thorough endnotes provide much information about Nepal, its people and solar power as well as instructions for making a solar oven. This tale of sibling compassion and ingenuity provides enough story for enjoyment alone but would also work well as an introduction to another culture and religion.—Sara-Jo Lupo Sites, George F. Johnson Memorial Library, Endicott, NY

Grades 1-3
Easy Reading Plus
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