Chat with us, powered by LiveChat

Cat Dog Dog: The Story of a Blended Family



by
Nelly Buchet
illustrated by
Andrea Zuill

Edition
Library edition with trade jacket added
Publisher
Penguin Random House
Imprint
Schwartz & Wade
ISBN
9781984849007

Awards and Honors
2021 Irma Simonton Black and James H. Black Award Winner for Excellence in Children's Literature
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$12.90   $10.75
SEE MEMBER PRICE
QTY
Out of stock

JLG Category

Kindergarten Plus

Cat and Dog live with their human in a suburban house with a big backyard. Sure, they fight like…. Well, cats and dogs, but they’re used to one another. Dog—a different dog—lives a happy only child life in the city with his dad. He has the bed to himself, he never has to share his toys, and that’s the way he likes it. So what happens when the Dog’s dad and Cat and Dog’s mom move in together?

Well, it’s chaotic. There’s not enough room on the bed, for starters. But as the seasons pass, the three animals become a trio and learn to (mostly) love one another. Just as they’re settling into a cozy life as a threesome, along comes…a baby!

This laugh-out-loud picture book, which cleverly uses two repeating words, is sure to strike a chord with kids dealing with the ups-and-downs of settling into a blended family of their own.

Full-color illustrations were rendered in ink, compiled digitally, and colored in Photoshop.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

40

Trim Size

8 1/2" x 11"

Dewey

E

AR

0: points 0

Lexile

NP

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

0

JLG Release

Sep 2020

Book Genres

Picture Book

Topics

Dogs. Cats. Pets. Stepfamilies. Blended families. Humorous stories.

Standard MARC Records

Download Standard MARC Records

Cover Art

Download Cover Art

Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Kirkus Reviews, School Library Journal

School Library Journal

When two adults move in with one another, many elements of their lives merge: eating habits, sleeping routines, furniture styles, levels of cleanliness, and children if they have them. The adults in this story do not have children, but they do have pets. When the couple moves in together, their two dogs and one cat humorously learn to get along with one another through a series of mishaps, like chewed moving boxes or a tumble out of a first-floor window. The text consists of virtually only two words: “dog” and “cat.” For instance, before the man and his dog move in with the woman, each panel has only the word “dog,” reinforcing the fact that the dog is the only animal in the household. However, once the couple moves in with one another, the text is presented in various combinations, like “dog cat dog” or the title phrase “cat dog dog” with the occasional “bird” or “frog” interjected for some variety. With text this simple, it’s up to the pictures to tell the story. Bold lines and bright colors create the feeling of a Sunday morning comic strip, and the animals have expressive faces. The same level of detail isn’t given to the humans in the story, so they aren’t missed when they disappear for the majority of the book. This unusual offering takes the adult concept of cohabitation and gives it a picture book spin by filtering it through the eyes of its animal protagonists. The animals in the story may serve as a useful analog for children who are members of blended families themselves.

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

When two adults move in with one another, many elements of their lives merge: eating habits, sleeping routines, furniture styles, levels of cleanliness, and children if they have them. The adults in this story do not have children, but they do have pets. When the couple moves in together, their two dogs and one cat humorously learn to get along with one another through a series of mishaps, like chewed moving boxes or a tumble out of a first-floor window. The text consists of virtually only two words: “dog” and “cat.” For instance, before the man and his dog move in with the woman, each panel has only the word “dog,” reinforcing the fact that the dog is the only animal in the household. However, once the couple moves in with one another, the text is presented in various combinations, like “dog cat dog” or the title phrase “cat dog dog” with the occasional “bird” or “frog” interjected for some variety. With text this simple, it’s up to the pictures to tell the story. Bold lines and bright colors create the feeling of a Sunday morning comic strip, and the animals have expressive faces. The same level of detail isn’t given to the humans in the story, so they aren’t missed when they disappear for the majority of the book. This unusual offering takes the adult concept of cohabitation and gives it a picture book spin by filtering it through the eyes of its animal protagonists. The animals in the story may serve as a useful analog for children who are members of blended families themselves.

Grades PreK-K
Kindergarten Plus
For Grades PreK-K

Filled with concept books and simple stories, this is an ideal category for youngsters who enjoy reading by themselves and following narratives through pictures. Vivid illustrations are an integral part of each book. Get 12 books per year filled with exceptional illustrations.

14 books per Year
$251.02 per Year
Interests
Animals,Beginning Readers,Fiction,Nonfiction,Picture Books,Storytime/Read Alouds
Like this book?
Get more like this every month.
LEARN MORE
Grades PreK-K
Kindergarten Plus
14 books per Year
$251.02 per Year

Other Recommended Titles From Kindergarten Plus

Mina

by Matthew Forsythe

Kindergarten Plus

April 2022

Where Is Bina Bear?

by Mike Curato

Kindergarten Plus

March 2022

Amos McGee Misses the Bus

by Philip C. Stead

Kindergarten Plus

February 2022

Off-Limits

by Helen Yoon

Kindergarten Plus

January 2022
Copyright © 2017 Magento, Inc. All rights reserved.