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      Honeybee: The Busy Life of Apis Mellifera

      by Candace Fleming

      Apr 2020

      Nonfiction Early Elementary

      Beginning at birth, the honeybee emerges through the wax cap of her cell and is driven to protect and take care of her hive. She cleans the nursery and feeds the larvae and the queen. But is she strong enough to fly? Not yet! She builds wax comb to store honey, and transfers pollen from other bees into the storage. She defends the hive from invaders. Apis accomplishes all of this before beginning her life outdoors as an adventurer, seeking nectar to bring back to her hive.

      Get up close and personal with Apis, one honeybee, as she embarks on her journey through life, complete with exquisitely detailed illustrations.

      Bear Goes Sugaring

      by Maxwell Eaton III

      Mar 2020

      Nonfiction Early Elementary

      Did you know that it takes forty gallons of sap to make one gallon of maple syrup? “How many pancakes can I eat with that gallon?” wonders Dog.

      Every step of the process of making maple syrup is covered in this sweet (but never saccharine) informational picture book by Maxwell Eaton III, the creator of the popular “Truth About” series. It begins with Bear assembling the tools she’ll need for the project, continues with a discussion of the types of maples found in the area and why sugar maples are best for tapping, then on to drilling, tapping, evaporation and at the end of the process, real maple syrup and best of all, PANCAKES! Along the way there are hilarious asides from increasingly ravenous Dog and Squirrel, making this a book as funny as it is informative.

      Author’s note. Further reading. Full-color illustrations.

      Snow Leopard: Ghost of the Mountains

      by Justin Anderson

      Feb 2020

      Nonfiction Early Elementary

      The people who live among the high peaks of the Himalayas tell stories of a mysterious animal called the gray ghost. To see one, you’d have to be very lucky indeed. Join a zoologist in the Himalayan mountains as he searches for the elusive creature. With her pale gold and silver-gray coat painted with black rosettes, she blends so well into the boulders, it’s no wonder she’s thought of as a ghost of the mountains. But the fortunate few who spot her are rewarded with a sight they will never forget. Written by an expert with firsthand experience, beautifully illustrated, and interwoven with fascinating facts, this vicarious look at a breathtaking animal includes an end note suggesting resources to explore.

      More about snow leopards. Suggestions for further information. Index. Full-color illustrations done in watercolor.

      The Boy Who Invented the Popsicle: The Cool Science Behind Frank Epperson's Famous Frozen Treat

      by Anne Renaud

      Jan 2020

      Nonfiction Early Elementary

      Since inventing begins with experimenting, Frank spends a lot of time in his "laboratory" (i.e., his back porch) trying out his ideas, such as building a double-handled handcar that whizzes past the single-handled cars in his neighborhood. What Frank loves most, though, is experimenting with liquids. When he invents his own yummy flavored soda water drink, his friends love it! And this gets him to thinking: "I wonder what this drink would taste like frozen?" Though he doesn't yet realize it, his curiosity will lead to his best invention ever: the Popsicle!

      In this innovative picture book, Anne Renaud tells a lively story inspired by a real person and true events. Budding scientists will be inspired to emulate the way Frank follows his curiosity, works hard and never gives up—a growth mindset in action. Interwoven within the story are full-page illustrated instructions for four science experiments that Frank performs, so readers can try them at home or school. Thoroughly researched back matter provides additional historical notes, photos, and a bibliography. This readable book covers social studies topics including early twentieth-century history and inventions and inventors, as well as science topics such as simple chemistry experiments and an overview of the skills and strategies of scientific inquiry.

      Full-color mixed-media illustrations.

      16 Words: William Carlos Williams and "The Red Wheelbarrow"

      by Lisa Rogers

      Dec 2019

      Nonfiction Early Elementary

      "Look out the window. What do you see? If you are Dr. William Carlos Williams, you see a wheelbarrow. A drizzle of rain. Chickens scratching in the damp earth."

      The wheelbarrow belongs to Thaddeus Marshall, a street vendor, who every day goes to work selling vegetables on the streets of Rutherford, New Jersey. That simple action inspires poet and doctor Williams to pick up some of his own tools—a pen and paper—and write his most famous poem.

      In this lovely picture book, young listeners will see how paying attention to the simplest everyday things can inspire the greatest art, as they learn about a great American poet.

      Author’s note. Selected bibliography. “Some William Carlos Williams Poems to Enjoy.” Full-color illustrations rendered digitally.

      I'm Trying to Love Math

      by Bethany Barton

      Nov 2019

      Nonfiction Early Elementary

      Do multiplication tables give you hives? Do you break out in a sweat when you see more than a few numbers hanging out together? Then I’m Trying to Love Math is for you! In her signature hilarious style, Bethany Barton introduces readers to the things (and people) that use math in amazing ways—like music, and spacecraft, and even baking cookies! This isn’t a how-to math book, it’s a way to think differently about math as a necessary and cool part of our lives!

      Full-color illustrations created using Higgins inks, Photoshop CC, and Rebelle 3.

      Hummingbird

      by Nicola Davies

      Oct 2019

      Nonfiction Early Elementary

      Tz’unun! Tz’unun! A buzz of wings, a flash of color… There’s a very special visitor in Granny’s garden. It’s a hummingbird! And it’s just about to begin its long migration, heading north to its nesting ground. Watch as it spreads joy to all who encounter it along its two-thousand-mile trek.

      In an engaging text sprinkled with facts, zoologist Nicola Davies introduces readers to this valiant bird, lighter than a nickel, while Jane Ray’s lush, intricate illustrations, accented in gold Pantone, highlight its jewel-like beauty. More details about hummingbirds, along with a bibliography and an index, are available at the end to budding ornithologists.

      More about ruby-throated hummingbirds. Bibliography. Index. Full-color illustrations done in watercolor and watercolor pencil with gold ink.

      Pollen: Darwin's 130 Year Prediction

      by Darcy Pattison

      Sep 2019

      Nonfiction Early Elementary

      How long does it take for science to find an answer to a problem? On January 25, 1862, naturalist Charles Darwin received a box of orchids. One flower, the Madagascar star orchid, fascinated him. It had an 11.5" nectary, the place where flowers make nectar, the sweet liquid that insects and birds eat. How, he wondered, did insects pollinate the orchid?

      After experiments, he made a prediction. There must be a giant moth with a 11.5" proboscis, a strawlike tongue. Darwin died without ever seeing the moth, which was catalogued by entomologists in in 1903. But still no one had actually observed the moth pollinating the orchid.

      In 1992, German entomologist, Lutz Thilo Wasserthal, Ph.D. traveled to Madagascar. By then, the moths were rare. He managed to capture two moths and released them in a cage with the orchid. He captured the first photo of the moth pollinating the flower, as Darwin had predicted 130 years before.

      This exciting pollen science book includes backmatter information on the moth, the orchid, Charles Darwin, Lutz Wasserthal. Also included is Wasserthal’s original photo taken in 1992.

      Further information on Morgan’s Sphinx moth, Madagascar star orchid, Charles Darwin, and Lutz Thilo Wasserthal. Sources. Glossary. Full-color illustrations and photographs.

      Seashells : More Than a Home

      by Melissa Stewart

      Aug 2019

      Nonfiction Early Elementary

      Young naturalists discover thirteen seashells in this elegant introduction to the remarkable versatility of shells. A dual-layered narrative highlights how shells provide more than a protective home. The informative sidebars underscore characteristics specific to each shell. Elegant watercolor illustrations create a scrapbook feel, depicting children from around the world observing and sketching seashells across

      Author’s note. Illustrator’s note. Selected sources. Further reading. Full-color illustrations done in watercolor.

      Seeds Move!

      by Robin Page

      Jul 2019

      Nonfiction Early Elementary

      Every seed, big or small, needs sunlight, water, and an uncrowded place to put down roots. But how do seeds get to the perfect place to grow? This exploration of seed dispersal covers a wide range of seeds and the creatures that help them move, from a coconut seed floating on waves to an African grass seed rolled by a dung beetle, to a milkweed seed floating on the wind.

      Full-color illustrations rendered in Adobe Photoshop.

      The Crayon Man: The True Story of the Invention of Crayola Crayons

      by Natascha Biebow

      Jun 2019

      Nonfiction Early Elementary

      Out of stock
      What child doesn't love to hold a crayon in their hands? But children didn't always have such magical boxes of crayons. Before Edwin Binney set out to change things, children couldn't really even draw in color. Here’s the true story of an inventor who so loved nature’s vibrant colors that he found a way to bring the outside world to children – in a bright green box for only a nickel!

      “How Crayola Crayons Are Made Today.” More information on Edwin Binney. Selected bibliography. Full-color photographs and illustrations done in charcoal crayon, gouache, and digital color.

      Beware of the Crocodile

      by Martin Jenkins

      May 2019

      Nonfiction Early Elementary

      You probably know a little about crocodiles already. They’re reptiles, they have an awful lot of teeth, and they’re pretty scary—at least, the big ones are! They’re not very fussy about what they eat, and when it comes to hunting down dinner, crocodiles are very determined…and very cunning. But there’s more to crocodiles than just their appetites. They love to nap on warm sandbanks and cool off in calm waters, and crocodile mothers are very gentle with their babies. This book takes a fascinating look at one of Earth’s most infamous creatures.

      Further information about crocodiles. Online resources. Index. Full-color mixed media illustrations.
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