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      Changing the Equation: 50+ US Black Women in STEM

      by Tonya Bolden

      Apr 2020

      Biography Middle Plus

      Award-winning author Tonya Bolden explores the black women who have changed the world of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) in America. Including groundbreaking computer scientists, doctors, inventors, physicists, pharmacists, mathematicians, aviators, and many more, this book celebrates more than 50 women who have shattered the glass ceiling, defied racial discrimination, and pioneered in their fields. In these profiles, young readers will find role models, inspirations, and maybe even reasons to be the STEM leaders of tomorrow. These stories help young readers to dream big and stay curious.

      Girl Under a Red Moon: Growing Up During China’s Cultural Revolution

      by Da Chen

      Mar 2020

      Biography Middle Plus

      In a small village called Yellow Stone, in southeastern China, Sisi is a model sister, daughter, and student. She brews tea for her grandfather in the morning, leads recitations at school as class monitor, and helps care for her youngest brother, Da.

      But when students are selected during a school ceremony to join the prestigious Red Guard, Sisi is passed over. Worse, she is shamed for her family's past—they are former landowners who have no place in the new Communist order. Her only escape is to find work at another school, bringing Da along with her. But the siblings find new threats in Bridge Town, too, and Sisi will face choices between family and nation, between safety and justice. With the tide of the Cultural Revolution rising, Sisi must decide if she will swim against the current, or get swept up in the wave.

      Author’s note. Black-and-white photographs and illustrations.

      Infinite Hope: A Black Artist's Journey from World War II to Peace

      by Ashley Bryan

      Feb 2020

      Biography Middle Plus

      In May of 1942, at the age of eighteen, Ashley Bryan was drafted to fight in World War II. For the next three years, he would face the horrors of war as a black soldier in a segregated army. He endured the terrible lies white officers told about the black soldiers to isolate them from anyone who showed kindness—including each other. He received worse treatment than even Nazi POWs. He was assigned the grimmest, most horrific tasks, like burying fallen soldiers…but was told to remove the black soldiers first because the media didn’t want them in their newsreels. And he waited and wanted so desperately to go home, watching every white soldier get safe passage back to the United States before black soldiers were even a thought.

      For the next forty years, Ashley would keep his time in the war a secret. But now, he tells his story. The story of the kind people who supported him. The story of the bright moments that guided him through the dark. And the story of his passion for art that would save him time and time again.

      “A Note About the Children.” Sources. Index. Full-color illustrations and reproductions.

      Her Own Two Feet: A Rwandan Girl's Brave Fight to Walk

      by Meredith Davis

      Jan 2020

      Biography Middle Plus

      Rebeka Uwitonze was born in Rwanda with curled and twisted feet, which meant she had to crawl or be carried to get around. At nine years old, she gets an offer that could change her life. A doctor in the US might be able to turn her feet. But it means leaving her own family behind and going to America on her own.

      Her Own Two Feet tells Rebeka's inspiring story through her eyes, with the help of one of her hosts. She travels from Rwanda to Austin, Texas, to join the Davis family, despite knowing almost no English. In the face of dozens of hospital visits and painful surgeries, Rebeka's incredible bravery and joyful spirit carry her to the opportunity of a lifetime. A stunning debut about hope, perseverance, and what becomes possible when you take a risk.

      Glossary. “A Note from Rebeka.” “A Note from Meredith.” About Africa New Life Ministries. Black-and-white photographs.

      Born to Fly: The First Women's Air Race Across America

      by Steve Sheinkin

      Dec 2019

      Biography Middle Plus

      Just nine years after American women finally got the right to vote, a group of trailblazers soared to new heights in the 1929 Air Derby, the first official women-only air race across the US. Follow the incredible lives of legend Amelia Earhart, who has captivated generations of young women; Marvel Crosson, who built a plane with her own hands before she even learned how to fly; Louise Thaden, who bravely shattered jaw-dropping altitude records; and Elinor Smith, who made headlines at age seventeen when she flew under the Brooklyn Bridge.

      Source notes. Works cited. Index. Black-and-white illustrations and photographs.

      Undaunted: The Wild Life of Biruté Mary Galdikas and Her Fearless Quest to Save Orangutans

      by Anita Silvey

      Oct 2019

      Biography Middle Plus

      As a young scientist, Birute Mary Galdikas had a mission: To find and study the elusive orangutans of Borneo’s rain forest to help protect this amazing and elusive species. Follow her story as she carries out an epic search and struggles to survive while studying the world’s most endangered great ape.

      When Galdikas saw her first image of an orangutan in the wild, she was immediately captivated. It haunted her and she found its gaze “almost hypnotic.” She moved to Borneo, where she made it her life’s mission to study and work to protect these mysterious creatures. Like primatologists Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey, Galdikas was driven by incredible ambition and a fascination with apes and human origins, making her way to the harsh rain forests of Indonesian Borneo when she was just 25 years old. She set up a simple camp, named after her mentor, Louis Leakey, and proceeded to look…and look…and look for wild orangutans, one of the most elusive species on the planet. Her studies brought these critically endangered apes to the world stage, and they are still making an impact today. Now in her 70s, Dr. Galdikas has conducted the longest running study of any wild mammal by any single scientist.

      “Orangutan Family Scrapbook.” Time line. Note on Borneo’s plants. Suggestions for further information. Source notes. Index. Author’s note. Black-and-white and full-color photographs and maps.

      Dear America: Young Readers' Edition: The Story of an Undocumented Citizen

      by Jose Antonio Vargas

      Oct 2019

      Biography Middle Plus

      In this young readers' adaptation of his adult memoir Dear America, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and undocumented immigrant Jose Antonio Vargas tells his story, in light of the 12 million undocumented immigrants currently in America.

      Jose Antonio Vargas was only twelve years old when he was brought to the United States from the Philippines to live with his grandparents. Unbeknownst to him, he was sent to the U.S. illegally. When he applied for a learner’s permit, he learned the truth, and spent the next almost twenty years keeping his immigration status a secret. Hiding in plain sight, he was writing for some of the most prestigious news organizations in the country. Only after publicly admitting his undocumented status—risking his career and personal safety—was Vargas able to live his truth.

      This book asks questions like, How do you define who is an American? How do we decide who gets to be a citizen? What happens to those who enter the U.S. without documentation? By telling his personal story, and presenting facts without easy answers, Jose Antonio Vargas sheds light on an issue that couldn’t be more relevant.

      Union Made: Labor Leader Samuel Gompers and His Fight for Workers' Rights

      by Norman H. Finkelstein

      Aug 2019

      Biography Middle Plus

      Born in England, Samuel Gompers grew up watching his father roll cigars, and at 10 years old, started rolling them himself. After immigrating to the United States, Gompers soon discovered his vocation to fight for the American laborer in his personal work experience. His charismatic, outspoken personality soon landed him the role of speaking on behalf of his fellow workers. His participation in various unsuccessful unions and other failed ventures to enact labor changes led to his creation of the American Federation of Labor. Faced with strikes that turned violent, opposition from the government, and lies perpetrated by anti-unionizers, Gompers persevered, and lived to see various measures enacted to ensure safe work environments, workers’ compensation, and other basic laborer rights.

      Author’s note. Time line. Source notes. Bibliography. Index. Black-and-white photographs and reproductions.

      Dreaming in Code: Ada Byron Lovelace, Computer Pioneer

      by Emily Arnold McCully

      May 2019

      Biography Middle Plus

      Even by 1800s standards, Ada Byron Lovelace had an unusual upbringing. Her strict mother worked hard at cultivating her own role as the long-suffering ex-wife of bad-boy poet Lord Byron while raising Ada in isolation. Tutored by the brightest minds, Ada developed a hunger for mental puzzles, mathematical conundrums, and scientific discovery that kept pace with the breathtaking advances of the industrial and social revolutions taking place in Europe. At seventeen, Ada met eccentric inventor Charles Babbage, a kindred spirit. Their ensuing collaborations resulted in ideas and concepts that presaged computer programming by almost two hundred years, and Ada Lovelace is now recognized as a pioneer and prophet of the information age.

      Epilogue. Afterword. Appendices. Source notes. Glossary. Bibliography. Index. Black-and-white photography and reproductions.

      Cyrus Field's Big Dream: The Daring Effort to Lay the First Transatlantic Telegraph Cable

      by Mary Morton Cowan

      Feb 2019

      Biography Middle Plus

      In the mid-1800s, no one knew if it was possible to connect North America and the United Kingdom with a telegraph line that would enable instant communication. Cyrus Field wasn't dissuaded by this fact . . . or by his numerous setbacks. Author's note. Time line. Resources. Source notes. Selected bibliography. Index. Black-and-white and full-color illustrations, photographs, and reproductions.

      Taking Cover: One Girl’s Story of Growing Up During the Iranian Revolution

      by Nioucha Homayoonfar

      Jan 2019

      Biography Middle Plus

      In 1979, eight-year-old Nioucha Homayoonfar moved from the United States to Tehran with her family and had to adjust to a new life and culture—during the turbulent Iranian Revolution. Author’s note. Foreword by Firoozeh Dumas. Afterword. Map. Time line.

      The Beloved World of Sonia Sotomayor: From the Bronx to the Supreme Court

      by Sonia Sotomayor

      Nov 2018

      Biography Middle Plus

      As a child, Sonia Sotomayor dreamed of becoming a lawyer and a judge—though she'd never met one of either, and none lived in her neighborhood. As she grew up, she didn't let hardships stand in her way. Family tree. Glossary of Spanish words. Brief history of the Supreme Court. Black-and-white photo insert.
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