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I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban

By: Malala Yousafzai

Christina Lamb

In 2012, Taliban attackers opened fire on teenage activist Malala Yousafzai. If given the chance, Malala says, “I would have explained to them why they should let us girls go to school.” Map. Glossary. Time line of important events in Pakistan and Swat. Note on the Malala Fund. Full-color photograph inserts.

ISBN: 9780316322409

JLG Release: Dec 2013


Sensitive Areas: Violence: War/Harsh Realities of War, Violence: Mild Violence
Topics: The Middle East , Pakistan , Education , Girls and women , Global War on Terrorism , Literacy , Islam , Media , Activism , Nobel Peace Prize , Schools

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Awards & Honors

2014 Amelia Bloomer Project List, Young Adult Nonfiction, Top Ten

Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

School Library Journal

Who is Malala, the girl who was shot by the Taliban on her way home from school, who gave a speech at the United Nations on her 16th birthday, the youngest person nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize? One must start in her beloved Swat Valley in Pakistan. Its history is complicated, but Mingora was basically peaceful until the Taliban began to infiltr Who is Malala, the girl who was shot by the Taliban on her way home from school, who gave a speech at the United Nations on her 16th birthday, the youngest person nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize? One must start in her beloved Swat Valley in Pakistan. Its history is complicated, but Mingora was basically peaceful until the Taliban began to infiltrate. One must understand Malala’s relationship with her father, whose work as an educator shaped and encouraged his daughter’s passion. Malala always loved going to school, and she was frequently at the top of her class. In lyrical writing that touches on the natural world and love for God, her achievements and honors alternate with stories of time spent with friends and family, illuminating Pakistani culture along the way. Malala believes that change is possible, that education is a basic human right, even in a region caught between a corrupt army and the Taliban. She frequently spoke in person and on television, and wrote a blog for the BBC under a pseudonym. She believed that God would protect her, that it was her duty to speak up for the rights of girls. Following the shooting, the account of Malala’s miraculous recovery is especially compelling. Her parents were stuck in Swat, so she spent those terrible days alone at a Pakistani army hospital ill-equipped to give her the care she required. Now she is obviously lonely, living under guard in Birmingham, England. She misses her friends and teachers. She is determined to return to Pakistan. Meanwhile, her school keeps an empty desk and chair waiting for her.—Angela Carstensen, Convent of the Sacred Heart, New York City

Junior Library Guild

  • Malala explains in detail her journey toward becoming a globally recognized activist at sixteen. For example, when her father, who also publicly advocates for education, was asked by a friend if he knew anyone willing to blog about life under the Taliban for BBC Urdu, Malala wondered, “Why not me?”
  • Despite becoming a t
    • Malala explains in detail her journey toward becoming a globally recognized activist at sixteen. For example, when her father, who also publicly advocates for education, was asked by a friend if he knew anyone willing to blog about life under the Taliban for BBC Urdu, Malala wondered, “Why not me?”
    • Despite becoming a terrorist target for voicing her opinions, Malala has pride in her country and hope for its future. In the first chapter, she lovingly describes her home in the Swat Valley: “We have fields of wildflowers, orchards of delicious fruit, emerald mines and rivers full of trout.”
    • The writing fluidly integrates Malala’s personal story with an in-depth account of how the rise of the Taliban, the Global War on Terrorism, and ongoing conflicts have affected Pakistanis.
    • Though Malala’s voice is mature and pointed, she connects to teens with familiar interests—such as the Twilight series—and feelings, including her frustration at being only five feet tall as a teenager.
    • Malala’s survival story is remarkable in itself, but her courage and conviction to continue advocating for girls’ education will inspire teens as well. Malala states, “I don’t want to be thought of as the ‘girl who was shot by the Taliban’ but the ‘girl who fought for education.’”

Book Details

ISBN

9780316322409

First Release

December 2013

Genre

Dewey Classification

954.9122

Trim Size

6 1/2" x 9 3/4"

Page Count

352

Accelerated Reader

Level 7.1; Points: 16;

Scholastic Reading Counts

Level 8.5; Points: 20;

Lexile

Level 1000L

Format

Print Book

Edition

Hardcover edition

Publisher

Little, Brown

Potentially Sensitive Areas

Violence: War/Harsh Realities of War, Violence: Mild Violence

Topics

The Middle East, Pakistan, Education, Girls and women, Global War on Terrorism, Literacy, Islam, Media, Activism, Nobel Peace Prize, Schools,

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